Who’s Who of Indigenous Governance – Researchers


Toni Bauman

Toni Bauman is the Senior Research Fellow in Governance and Public Policy at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS). Ms Bauman is an anthropologist, mediator, facilitator and trainer who has published widely. She has over 30 years’ experience in Indigenous matters including land and native title claims, consensus building, agreement-making, decision-making and dispute management processes, co-management of protected areas, government policy, program evaluation, feasibility studies, and governance training. Toni Bauman works across multiple disciplines. A comprehensive bibliography of her publications is accessible on the AIATSIS website

Selected bibliography

Bauman, T (2006), Final Report of the Indigenous Facilitation and Mediation Project July 2003-June 2006: research findings, recommendations and implementation Indigenous Facilitation and Mediation Project Report, No. 6, NTRU, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra. 

Bauman, T & Pope, J (2008), Solid work you mob are doing: Case Studies in Indigenous Dispute Resolution & Conflict Management in Australia 2008, Federal Court of Australia, Melbourne. 

Bauman, T, Strelein, L M, & Weir, J K (Eds) (2013), Living with native title: the experiences of registered native title corporations, AIATSIS Research Publications Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra. 

Bauman, T, & Williams, R (2004), The Business of Process Research Issues in Managing Indigenous Decision-Making and Disputes in Land, Research Discussion Paper No. 13, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Native Title Research Unit, Canberra. 

Back to top of page


Professor Larissa Behrendt

Professor Larissa Behrendt is a Eualeyai/Kamillaroi woman. Professor Behrendt is Professor of Law and Director of Research at the Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning at the University of Technology, Sydney; she is admitted to the Supreme Court of the ACT and NSW as a barrister. Professor Behrendt has published extensively on Indigenous legal issues, held a number of positions across Indigenous justice, policy, performing arts, written several novels and short stories, and was recently nominated for a Walkely award for her work on the film Innocence Betrayed. She is currently a Chief Investigator on the research project Indigenous nationhood in the absence of recognition: Self‐governance insights and strategies from three Aboriginal communities. A comprehensive bibliography of her publications is accessible on the UTS website.

Selected bibliography

Behrendt, L. (2003). Achieving Social Justice Indigenous rights and Australia’s future. Sydney: The Federation Press. 

Behrendt, L., & Kelly, L. (2008). Resolving Indigenous Disputes Land conflict and beyond. Sydney: The Federation Press. 

Behrendt, L.Y., Libesman, T. & Cunneen, C. 2009, Indigenous Legal Relations in Australia, 1, Oxford University Press, Australia.

Brennan, S., Behrendt, L., Strelein, L., & Williams, G. (2005). Treaty . Sydney: The Federation Press. 

Reilly, L. Behrendt, G. Williams, R. McCausland and M. McMillan, ‘The promise of regional governance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities’ (2007) 1 Ngiya: Talk the Law 126-166. 

Back to top of page


Professor Michael Dodson

Professor Mick Dodson AM is a member of the Yawuru peoples. Professor Dodson has been a prominent advocate on land rights and other issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, as well as a vigorous advocate of the rights and interests of indigenous peoples around the world. Professor Dodson has written extensively on the rights of Indigenous Peoples in Australia and internationally. A comprehensive bibliography of his work is accessible on the National Centre of Indigenous Studies website.

Selected bibliography

Dodson, M (2012) Keynote. Common Roots, Common Futures: Different Paths to Self-Determination Conference. The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 20 – 22 February 2012. 

Dodson, M & Smith D (2003) Governance for Sustainable Development: Strategic Issues and Principles for Indigenous Australian Communities. CAEPR Discussion Paper No. 250, CAEPR, ANU, Canberra. 

Dodson, M & Strelein, L Australia’s Nation Building: Re-negotiating the Relationship between Indigenous Peoples and the State. UNSW Law Journal Vol. 1. 24(3). 

Back to top of page


Dr Michelle Evans

Dr. Michelle Evans works as an academic, writer, facilitator and cultural producer. She has contributed to a range of diverse disciplines including Indigenous education, Indigenous arts, leadership and entrepreneurship. Dr Evans has written extensively on Indigenous education, arts, leadership and entrepreneurship. A comprehensive bibliography of her publications is accessible on Charles Sturt University website.

Selected bibliography

Evans, M.M. (2014). Exploring Indigenous artistic leadership. In Banff Centre. Wise Practices in Indigenous Leadership, Banff: Banff Centre Press.

Evans, M.M. & Stott, L. (2008). Hearing the Unheard Voices: Practice-Based Approaches. In Sue McManus and Ros Tenneyson (Eds). Talking the Walk: A Communication Toolbook for partnership Practitioners, pp 15. London: International Business Leaders Forum. 

Evans, M.M. (Forthcoming) Navigating the territories of Indigenous leadership: Exploring the experiences and practices of Australian Indigenous Arts Leaders, Leadership.

Evans, M.M., Peredo, A.M., Ospina, S., and Tedmanson, D. (2013) Making Space for Indigenous Ways of seeing the world: From received hegemony to upholding diverse ways of doing, being and knowing. Academy of Management, Orlando Florida 9-13 August 2013.

Evans, M.M. and Sinclair, A. (2013) Navigating territories of Indigenous leadership. International Leadership Association Oceania Conference: Building the R&D of Leadership, Auckland New Zealand 22-24 April 2013.

Back to top of page


Dr Janet Hunt

Dr Janet Hunt is a fellow and Deputy Director at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) at the Australian National University. She previously managed the Indigenous Community Governance Project, an ARC Linkage Project with Reconciliation Australia. She has conducted research on the social benefits of Aboriginal involvement in natural resource management in NSW, and the work of international NGOs with Australian Indigenous communities. Her main interests are in Aboriginal development. A comprehensive bibliography of her work is accessible on the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research website. 

Selected bibliography

Hunt, J. 2013 ‘Engagement with Indigenous communities in key sectors’, Resource sheet no. 23, Closing the Gap Clearinghouse, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra, and AIFS, Melbourne.

Hunt, J. 2008, ‘Strengthening Indigenous community governance for sustainability: Using Indigenous principles in a community development approach’, New Community Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 18-23.

Hunt, J. 2007.  ‘Figuring Out Governance: Capacity Development for Indigenous Councils and Organisations’, Ngiya: Talk the Law: Governance in Indigenous Communities, Vol. 1: 103 – 125.

Hunt, J. and Campbell, D. 2013.’Using a community development approach for Aboriginal development in Central Australia’, Development Bulletin, 75: 35-8.

Hunt, J., & Smith, D. 2006. Further key insights from the Indigenous Community Governance Project. The Australian National University, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research,, Canberra.

Hunt, J.  Smith, D. Garling, S.  and Sanders, W. 2008. Contested Governance: Culture, power and institutions in Indigenous Australia,  ANU EPress, Canberra.

Hunt, J. and Withers, R. ‘What makes for successful Indigenous governance?’, in Community Governance Newsletter, 2 (2): 6, August 2006.

Back to top of page


Professor Miriam Jorgensen

Miriam is Professor of Indigenous Governance at the Melbourne School of Government at the University of Melbourne. She is also Research Director for the University of Arizona Native Nations Institute and for its sister program, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. Her work on Indigenous governance and economic development – in the US, Canada, and Australia – addresses issues as wide-ranging as welfare policy, policing and justice systems, natural resources, cultural stewardship, land ownership, enterprise management, financial education, and philanthropy. A comprehensive bibliography of her publications is available on the Native Nations Institute website.

Selected bibliography

Cornell, Stephen, Catherine Curtis, and Miriam Jorgensen. 2004. The Concept of Governance and its Implications for First Nations. Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs (JOPNA). Tucson and Cambridge: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy and Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development.

Cornell, Stephen, Miriam Jorgensen, and Joseph P. Kalt. 2002. First Nations Governance Act: Implications of Research Findings from the United States and Canada. A report to the Office of the British Columbia Regional Vice-Chief Assembly of First Nations. Tucson: Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy, The University of Arizona. 

Jorgensen, Miriam, ed. 2007. Rebuilding Native Nations: Strategies for Governance and Development. Foreword by Oren Lyons. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Tatum, Melissa L., Miriam Jorgensen, Mary E. Guss, and Sarah Deer. 2014. Structuring Sovereignty: Constitutions of Native Nations. UCLA American Indian Studies Center.

Back to top of page


Dr Loretta Kelly

Dr Loretta Kelly is a Gumbaynggirr and Dungutti woman from the mid-north coast of New South Wales. Dr Kelly is a Senior Lecturer at the Gnibi College Indigenous Australian Peoples, Southern Cross Univeristy. She holds a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws and has worked for a number of community and government organisations involved in family violence, mediation and conferencing.

Selected bibliography

Behrendt, L., & Kelly, L. (2008). Resolving Indigenous Disputes Land conflict and beyond. Sydney: The Federation Press .

Garkawe, S., Kelly, L., & Fisher, W. (Eds.). (2001). Indigenous Human Rights. Sydney: Institute of Criminology. 

Kelly, Loretta (2006) “Community mediation services: towards good practice mediation for Aboriginal people,” ADR Bulletin: Vol. 8: No. 10, Article 1. 

Back to top of page


Professor Marcia Langton 

Professor Marcia Langton is the Inaugural Chair of Australian Indigenous Studies at the University of Melbourne. Professor Langton is a descendant of the Yiman people of central Queensland. Professor Langton has written extensively on agreement-making, land use, anthropology and Indigenous art. A comprehensive bibliography of her publications is accessible on the University of Melbourne website

Selected bibliography 

Langton, M, Firth, A. ‘Legal personality and native title corporations: The problem of perpetual succession’ In Strelein, L (ed) Dialouge about land justice: Papers from the Native Title Conference, Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press.

Langton, M., Mazel, O., Palmer, L., Shain, K., & Tehan, M. (Eds.). (2006). Settling with Indigenous People” Modern treaty and agreement making. Sydney: The Federation Press. 

Langton, M., Tehan, M., Palmer, L., & Shain, K. (Eds.). (2004). Honour among Nations? Treaties and Agreements with Indigenou People. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press Ltd. 

Back to top of page


Dr Mark McMillan

Dr Mark McMillan is a Wiradjuri man from Trangie, NSW. He was named National NAIDOC Scholar of the year for 2013. His research interests are in the area of human rights and, in particular, the expression and fulfillment of those rights for Indigenous Australians. A comprehensive bibliography of his research and publications is available on the University of Melbourne, Law School website.

Selected bibliography

McMillan, ‘ATSIC reflections’ (2009) 10 Journal of Indigenous Policy 99-105.

Reilly, L. Behrendt, G. Williams, R. McCausland and M. McMillan, ‘The promise of regional governance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities’ (2007) 1 Ngiya: Talk the Law 126-166.

Back to top of page


Professor Daryle Rigney 

Professor Daryle Rigney, a citizen of the Ngarrindjeri Nation, is Dean of Indigenous Strategy and Engagement, Flinders University. Daryle’s research interests include Indigenous governance and nation building, cultural heritage and property protection, natural resource management and local, national and global Indigenous engagement and collaboration. Daryle chairs Ngarrindjeri Enterprises Pty Ltd (NEPL) the economic development company of the Ngarrindjeri Regional Authority (NRA), co-chairs the NRA’s Research, Policy and Planning Unit, co-chairs the United League of Indigenous Nations (ULIN) and is a Director of the Australian Centre for Social Innovation (TASCI). A comprehensive bibliography of his writings and publications are located on the Flinders University website. 

Selected bibliography

Hemming, S.J., Rigney, D.M. and Berg, S. (2011). Ngarrindjeri Futures: Negotiation, governance and environmental management. In Maddison, S. &

Brigg, M., ed. Unsettling the Settler State: Creativity and Resistance in Indigenous Settler-State Governance. Sydney, NSW: Federation Press, pp. 98-113.

Hemming, S.J. and Rigney, D.M. (2010). Ngarrindjeri strategies for positive transformation and the Murray Futures Program. In Indigenous Policy and Dialogue: New Relationships, New Possibilities. National Indigenous Policy and Dialogue Conference. University of New South Wales, Sydney. Nov 2010, pp. 26-26.

Rigney, L.H., Tur, S.L. and Rigney, D.M. (2002). Treaty: Facillitators Guide, pp. 100.

Hemming, S.J. and Rigney, D.M. (2008). Unsettling sustainability: Ngarrindjeri political literacies, strategies of engagement and transformation. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 22(6) pp. 757-775.

Back to top of page


Dr Diane Smith

Dr Diane Smith is an anthropologist with over 40 years experience working with Indigenous Australian communities and organisations. Diane joined the National Centre of Indigenous Studies in April 2015 as its Higher Degree by Research (HDR) Program Manager. Diane was Chief Investigator of the ground-breaking Australian Indigenous Community Governance Research and subsequently wrote the learning content for the Indigenous Governance Toolkit. A comprehensive bibliography of her publications are accessible on the National Centre of Indigenous Studies website

Selected bibliography

Hunt, J., & Smith, D. (2006). Further key insights from the Indigenous Community Governance Project. The Australian National University, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, Canberra.

Hunt, D.E. Smith, S. Garling, and W. Sanders (eds), Contested Governance: Culture, Power and Institutions in Indigenous Australia, CAEPR Research Monograph No. 29, ANU E Press, Canberra, pp. 27-53. 

Smith, D. E. (2004). From Gove to Governance: Reshaping Indigenous Governance in the Northern Territory. CAEPR Discussion Paper No. 265, CAEPR, ANU, Canberra. 

Smith, D. E. (2005) Researching Australian Indigenous Governance: A Methodological and Conceptual Framework, CAEPR Working Paper No. 29, CAEPR, ANU, Canberra. 

Smith, D.E. (2005) ‘Indigenous households and community governance’, in D. Austin-Broos and G. Macdonald (eds), Culture, Economy and Governance in Aboriginal Australia, Sydney University Press, Sydney. 

Smith, D.E. (2007) ‘Networked governance: Issues of process, policy and power in a West Arnhem Land regional initiative’, Ngiya Talk the Law: Governance in Indigenous Communities, 1 (June): 24-52.

Smith, D.E. (2009) ‘From Collaboration to Coercion: A story of governance failure, success and opportunity in Australian Indigenous Affairs’, chapter in Governing Through Collaboration: Managing Better Through Others, Australian and New Zealand School of Government, ANU EPress publication.

Smith, D.E. (2011) ‘Cultures of Governance and the Governance of Culture: Indigenous Australians and the State’, PhD Thesis (Anthropology), The Australian National University, ACT. 

Back to top of page


Dr Lisa Strelein

Dr Lisa Strelein is Director of Research Strategy at the Australian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) and Adjunct Professor, National Centre for Indigenous Studies, College of Law, Australian National University. Lisa’s research and publications focus on the relationship between Indigenous peoples and the state, and the role of the courts in defining Indigenous peoples’ rights. Dr Strelein has written extensively on Native Title in Australia. A comprehensive bibliography of her publications are accessible on the AIATSIS website.

Selected bibliography 

Bauman, T., Strelein, L. M., & Weir, J. K. (Eds.). (2013). Living with native title : the experiences of registered native title corporations. AIATSIS Research Publications

Dodson, M., & Strelein, L. (2001). Australia’s nation-building: renegotiating the relationship between Indigenous peoples and the state. UNSW Law Journal , 24 (3), 826-839. 

Strelein, L. (Ed.). (2009). Compromised Jurisprudence: Native title cases since Mabo, 2nd Edition. Canberra: Aboriginal Studies Press. 

Strelein, L., & Tran, T. (2013). Building Indigenous Governance from Native Title: Moving away from ‘Fitting in’ to Creating a Decolonised Space. Review of Constitutional Studies , 18 (1).

Back to top of page


Dr Alison Vivian 

Dr Alison Vivian is a lawyer and Senior Researcher at the Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning (Research Unit) at UTS. She has practised law in the areas of native title; refugee and humanitarian law and international human rights law, and has taught international human rights law. Alison’s primary research focus relates to Indigenous nation-building and governance as an exercise of Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination. A comprehensive bibliography of her publications and current research projects is available on the UTS website

Selected bibliography

Behrendt, L.Y. & Vivian, A.M. State of Victoria 2010, Indigenous self-determination and the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities – a framework for discussion, pp. 1-32, Melbourne, Australia.

Vivian, A.M. 2009, ‘Conflict management in the native title system: A proposal for an Indigenous Dispute Resolution Tribunal’, Reform, vol. Autumn2009, no. 93, pp. 33-36.

Vivian, A.M. 2009, ‘The Social Effects of Native Title: Recognition, Translation, Coexistence’, Journal of Indigenous Policy, vol. 10, pp. 121-123.

Back to top of page


 

Comments are closed.

Copyright © 2013-2016 Australian Indigenous Governance Institute I ABN 87 158 627 386